Summer 2017 Course Description, Registration

WEDNESDAY

The Wonders of Age

“The Wonders of the Age" usually refers to the end of the 18th century, which gave birth to the Romantic Age:  Botanist Joseph Banks and Captain Cook discovered new geographic worlds; William Hershel and his sister Caroline changed our view of the solar system; Humphry Davy revolutionized chemistry; Mary Shelley, Coleridge and Keats became immortal authors.  Humanity earned important new knowledge – and it was an era both awe-inspiring and frightening.
 
So it is with our self-discoveries in our journey to the new world of Elderdom.  Discoveries from this journey and about the wonders of age fortunately have been shared by writers in many cultures and eras.  We shall consider what wonders Cicero, Erasmus, Montaigne, Simone de Beauvoir, Philip Roth and others discovered as well as what selected US and UK documentary films found – and then compare their findings with our own.

Wed 10:30-12:00am   •   July 12, 19, 26, August 2   •  4 sessions

Thomas Voss, Ph.D., LLD., is a retired university president and author of ten published academic books, including the multi-volume “William Cullen Bryant.” Co-host July 19, Dr. Thomas Caffrey, the prominent New York psychologist; co-host July 26 Warren Adler, award-winning author of 40 novels, including “The War of the Roses” and “The Sunset Gang.”

Register for: The Wonders of Age


Afternoon at the Movies

Join us for a wonderful afternoon at the movies. We will be showing a range of films – comedy, drama, music – and talking about their background and significance. All followed by a lively discussion with you.

Wed 1:00-3:45pm   •   July 12, 26, August 2   •  3 sessions

Louise Terry, M.A., Columbia University; college English instructor; Education Director, Accent on Language School.

Register for: Afternoon at the Movies


West-Eastern Divan Orchestra of Mideast Musicians Builds Bridges for Peace

 
In this multimedia presentation, Argentine-Israeli conductor Daniel Barenboim co-founds the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra with Edward Said, author of "Orientalism," hoping that young Arab and Israeli musicians can disagree without fighting.  This young orchestra has recently been designated as a United Nations Global Advocate for cultural understanding.  Argentine-Israeli pianist Martha Augerich joins the young musicians in their rehearsals and concert in Buenos Aires, where they spend some time in residence.

Wed 1:00-3:45pm   •   July 19   •  1 session

Jane Davis Sine, BA, Smith College, BS/MS Western Connecticut State University; graduate studies in piano and double bass; graduate studies in piano and cello in Uruguay and Argentina. String teacher for over 20 years; founder of artist management company representing classical musicians and conductors internationally. Currently teaches music appreciation courses on Hilton Head Island, at the University of South Carolina, at OLLI in Waterbury, CT; previously taught at Marymount Manhattan.

Register for: West-Eastern Divan Orchestra of Mideast Musicians Builds Bridges for Peace


THURSDAY

“Gone With The Wind” Has Never Gone

Eight decades after Margaret Mitchell’s book premiered, both it and the blockbuster movie that followed remain American classics.  The film has consistently placed in the top 10 of the American Film Institute's list of top 100 American films; it is preserved in the U.S. Library of Congress National Film Registry.  Scarlett O’Hara and Rhett Butler are vivid characters, their love story set against the turbulent eras of the Civil War and Reconstruction.  Behind the scenes, the casting of Vivien Leigh as the lead with Clark Gable, America’s biggest star, was a melodrama too.  We’ll revisit the movie with different (and more mature) eyes.  Can you see the Civil War from a Southerner’s perspective?  Are the portrayals of blacks as slaves and then as liberated free people dated, even racist?  (Reading the novel is recommended but optional.)

Thu 10:30-11:45am   •   July 13, 20, 27, August 3   •  4 sessions

Louise Terry, M.A., Columbia University; college English instructor; Education Director, Accent on Language School.

Register for: “Gone With The Wind” Has Never Gone


The Music of Dvorak, From Bohemia to Spillville, Iowa

Antonin Dvorak (1841-1904) was born in Bohemia, a rural region of western Czechoslovakia.  His major influences were folk melodies, the sounds of the language and of distant trains there.   He composed operas, concerti, piano trios and symphonies.  Invited by the National Conservatory of Music president in New York to come and create an American style of music, he conducted the symphony and opera, inspiring composers in our country.  He found peace and serenity in Spillville, an area settled by many Czechs and Slovaks, which reminded him of his early days.  This multimedia presentation will include Dvorak's cello concerto.
 
Thu 1:00-2:30pm   •   July 13, 20, 27, August 3   •  4 sessions

Jane Davis Sine, BA, Smith College, BS/MS Western Connecticut State University; graduate studies in piano and double bass; graduate studies in piano and cello in Uruguay and Argentina. String teacher for over 20 years; founder of artist management company representing classical musicians and conductors internationally. Currently teaches music appreciation courses on Hilton Head Island, at the University of South Carolina, at OLLI in Waterbury, CT; previously taught at Marymount Manhattan.

Register for: The Music of Dvorak, From Bohemia to Spillville, Iowa


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